New Nanostructured Glass Designed for Imaging and Recording

Researchers in the United Kingdom have developed a new nanostructured glass which contains the potential for new developments in the field of medical imaging and recording. The glass itself is smaller and cheaper to use than current imaging counterparts. Not only can this glass be used as an imaging tool but can also imprint those images directly into the glass thereby creating a visual copy. The article below details this process and exactly what this new nanostructured glass can accomplish.

By Medimaging International staff writers

UK researchers have developed new nanostructured glass optical elements that have potential applications in optical manipulation and should considerably reduce the cost of medical imaging.

In a study published online May 16, 2011, the journal Applied Physics Letters, a team led by Prof. Peter Kazansky from the University of Southampton’s (UK) Optoelectronics Research Center, described how they have used nanostructures to develop new monolithic glass space-variant polarization converters. These millimeter-sized devices generate “whirlpools” of light, thereby enabling precise laser material processing, optical manipulation of atom-sized objects, ultra-high resolution imaging, and potentially, tabletop particle accelerators. They have since found that the technology can be additionally developed for optical recording.

According to the researchers, at sufficient intensities, ultra-short laser pulses can be used to imprint tiny dots (like three-dimensional [3D] pixels) called voxels in glass. Their previous research showed that lasers with fixed polarization produce voxels consisting of a periodic arrangement of ultra-thin (tens of nanometers) planes. By passing polarized light through such a voxel imprinted in silica glass, the researchers observed that it travels differently depending on the polarization orientation of the light. This ‘form birefringence’ phenomenon is the basis of their new polarization converter.

The benefit of this approach over existing methods for microscopy is that it is 20 times less expensive and it is compact. “Before this we had to use a spatial light modulator based on liquid crystal, which cost about GBP 20,000,” said Prof. Kazansky. “Instead, we have just put a tiny device into the optical beam and we get the same result.”

Since publication of the study, the researchers have developed this technology further and adapted it for a five-dimensional optical recording. “We have improved the quality and fabrication time and we have developed this five-dimensional memory, which means that data can be stored on the glass and last forever,” said Martynas Beresna, lead researcher for the project. “No one has ever done this before.”

The researchers are working with the company Altechna (Vilnius, Lithuania) to introduce this technology to the market.

Read more here 

Share

Posted: August 29th, 2011 under Uncategorized.

RSS Medical Imaging News

  • In landmark study of cell therapy for heart attack, more cells make a difference November 21, 2014
    Physicians from 60 sites treated 161 heart attack patients with their own bone marrow cells, selected for their healing potential and then reinjected into the heart, in an effort to improve the heart's recovery. Their conclusion? Patients who receive more cells get significant benefits.
  • Fluorescent nanoprobe could become a universal, noninvasive method to identify and monitor tumors November 21, 2014
    Researchers have developed a hybrid metal-polymer nanoparticle that lights up in the acidic environment surrounding tumor cells. Nonspecific probes that can identify any kind of tumor are extremely useful for monitoring the location and spread of cancer and the effects of treatment, as well as aiding initial diagnosis.
  • Pain, magnet displacement in MRI in patients with cochlear implants November 20, 2014
    Pain, discomfort and magnet displacement were documented in a small medical records review study of patients with cochlear implants who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), according to a new report.
  • Two sensors in one: Nanoparticles that enable both MRI and fluorescent imaging could monitor cancer, other diseases November 18, 2014
    Chemists have developed new nanoparticles that can simultaneously perform magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescent imaging in animals. Such particles could help scientists to track specific molecules produced in the body, monitor a tumor's environment, or determine whether drugs have successfully reached their targets.
  • Heart muscle inflammation, swelling peak twice after heart attack November 18, 2014
    Results of a new study challenge the current consensus in cardiology that peak myocardial edema, or heart muscle swelling, only occurs just after a myocardial infarction, or heart attack.
  • US radiology departments prepare for Ebola November 18, 2014
    Radiologists have issued a special report on radiology preparedness for handling cases of Ebola virus. Healthcare administrators are placing a major emphasis on Ebola preparedness training at medical facilities throughout the U.S. Failure to have proper procedures in place to diagnose and treat patients with Ebola virus was cited as a major reason for infect […]
  • Fat around heart may cause irregular heartbeat November 17, 2014
    The layer of fat that surrounds the heart may be a better predictor of atrial fibrillation than body mass index, the most common measure of obesity, a study has found. Obesity is commonly measured as a person’s body mass index (BMI). But a new study has found that the layer of fat around the outside of the heart is more closely associated with atrial fibrill […]
  • New insights link Fragile X Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorders November 17, 2014
    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability (ID), as well as the most frequent monogenic cause of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). FXS is caused by the absence or incorrect production of the protein FMRP. Scientists have now pinpointed a novel role that FMRP plays during the embryonic development of the brain cortex […]
  • Routine imaging screening of diabetic patients for heart disease is not effective November 17, 2014
    Routine heart imaging screenings for people with diabetes at high risk to experience a cardiac event, but who have no symptoms of heart disease, does not help them avoid heart attacks, hospitalization for unstable angina or cardiac death, according to a major new study.
  • New imaging technique identifies receptors for targeted cancer therapy November 14, 2014
    A fluorescence imaging technique has been developed that can more accurately identify receptors for targeted cancer therapies without a tissue biopsy. "Accurately determining the population of protein receptors in a tumor available for targeting by molecular therapies or diagnostic imaging agents can greatly impact oncology patient outcomes," said […]

News Items

Links