Medical Imaging Becoming Safer for Pediatric Patients

The radiologists at Desert Valley Radiology continuously improve the care provided to their patients by the means of scientific research.  New research affecting the country covers coronary computer tomography angiography (CTA) which produces a high quality image and is less invasive for pediatric patients.  This technology will allow children to avoid cardiac catheterization and the radiation that is associated with it.  As well, adult and pediatric patients will be able to undergo the imaging process without anesthesia or sedation.

Although the heart rate of children has typically been too fast for the technology to obtain a proper image, new medication which slows the heart rate, as well as improved scanners have helped this problem.  A thorough study of this medical technology will be presented in Denver, CO on July 14-17 at the Sixth Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

For more information on this technology visit: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110717122331.htm

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Posted: July 19th, 2011 under Uncategorized.

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